#TheArtist’sWay #theartistswaychallenge #amwriting #amquerying #writingcommunity #writerslife #writersinquarantin

Goodreads Book Review – The Artist’s Way

Claim the Right to Creativity in Your Life

I completed this 12-week program during the COVID pandemic. Through seismic changes, both personal and in the world at large, I ended this journey in a very different place to the one where I began. I learned a lot from the morning pages and the artist’s dates. Some of the exercises were fun, even if they were a little silly.

The trick for me has been to balance my scepticism with my creativity, something that Cameron discusses often in the book. Like many creatives, I am inclined to feel guilty about spending time and energy on my frivolous creative pursuits and that I should concentrate on the real responsibilities of life. Cameron acknowledges this struggle and urges us to find a way to balance both. This is easier said than done. Sometimes you make it, sometimes you don’t. That’s ok, as long as you forgive yourself, get back on the horse and keep going.

If you would like to see how I fared on my creative journey through The Artist’s Way, take a look at my blog by following the link on my bio.

I would recommend this book to anyone who would like to take control of their creative life, whether starting out, or trying to find a better to manage their creative interests together with other responsibilities. I wish you all the best on your creative journey.

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/615570.The_Artist_s_Way

Posted by naomilisashippen in Goodreads Book Reviews, 0 comments
The Artist’s Way – Week 12: Recovering a Sense of Faith

The Artist’s Way – Week 12: Recovering a Sense of Faith

In The Final Week of The Artist’s Way, We Learn To Surrender to the Creative Force Within Us

This week, The Artist’s Way reiterates the importance of faith over control. Throughout the book, Cameron has said that creativity in all its forms comes to us from a higher power. And that while we must put in the time and effort, we must also relinquish control to a force greater that ourselves. This force, Cameron says, whether you call it God, The Universe or The Higher Power, is working with us to help us achieve our creative goals.

As a lapsed Catholic, I have found this message hard to swallow, as the God I was taught to believe in required servitude and was not interested in what I or anyone else wanted. But Cameron promises that if we have enough faith to claim our goals, the universe will come to the party and support us.

However, Cameron says, we must be prepared for creativity to come in its own form and not expect it to answer to the schedule we set it. There will be times when we must let creativity lie fallow and allow it the time it needs to gestate. Creativity cannot be forced and will not answer to the deadlines we set for it. We cannot squeeze 10 minutes of “quality time” into a hectic daily schedule and expect to have a good relationship with our artist child. Real life children won’t accept those conditions so why should the little artist that lives inside ourselves?

While our creativity is in hibernation, Cameron suggests, that we turn our attention to mundane tasks. Gardening, sewing or cleaning out our wardrobes gives our creative minds a break. Free from the pressure of having to perform, creativity will bubble away in the background and make its appearance when it’s ready.

But Cameron warns of a phenomenon that seems to arise just when our creativity has returned and we are about to go gangbusters with a new story idea, a role in a coveted play or return to that water colour we abandoned months ago. This phenomenon is what Cameron calls “The Test,” and is a particularly nasty and vicious little arrow aimed straight at your creative heart.

And I have had one hell of a test lately.

A couple of months ago, at the height of the pandemic, I announced to my husband that I would like to concentrate on writing my novel for the next few months. I lost my job just before COVID, but even if work became available, I told him I would like to stay home and put all my time and effort into writing my novel. Give it a red-hot go.

My husband, who was in a secure and well-paid job where he could work from home, gave me his full support. He said he was happy for me to put all my efforts into my novel and that I probably wouldn’t be able to find a job at this time, anyway.

But the following month, he walked out on me and our two sons to live with his new partner and her family.

While the time and effort I wanted to put into my new novel has been hijacked by the devastation this caused, I will not be deterred from my goal to complete two novels by the end of the year. But rather than having the luxury of being supported while I do this, I am going to have to balance writing with all the other responsibilities of life.

That’s OK. I’ve done it before.

For my artist’s date, I am going shopping for an ergonomic desk. I spend a lot of time writing and it is important that I have a desk that gives me the support I need. The second-hand chipboard bench my husband left behind sits too high and is causing me back problems.

And it simply won’t do anymore.

This is the last blog in this series, The Artist’s Way: My 12-Week Journey. Set during a time of seismic personal and global upheaval it has certainly been an interesting ride. Through it all, the morning pages and the artist’s dates have kept me grounded and focused on my writing goals. As has the support of the writing community, who has allowed me to share my story and vent my feelings and some ill-advised prose.

Thanks for staying with me, and I wish you all the best on your creative journey.

 

Love,

 

Naomi. xxx

Posted by naomilisashippen in The Artist's Way, 0 comments

The Artist’s Way – Week 11: Recovering a Sense of Autonomy

Taking Care of Mind, Body and Spirit Brings a Sense of Autonomy

This week, the Artist’s Way is all about finding the right balance between “have to” and “want to.” There are things all of us must do in order to survive, such as keeping our 9 to 5 job, taking care of our families and paying the bills. Rather than look at these demands as obstacles, Cameron urges us to find ways to incorporate our creative life into the rest of our lives. In other words, we must focus on what we can do, not on what we can’t do. This focus on the positive will empower us to recover our sense of autonomy.

Even if you manage to make money from your art, chances are your income for art alone is sporadic. It is impossible to know ahead of time what’s going to sell. While you need to be aware of what is going on in the artistic marketplace, to pander to it is a waste of time and effort. By the time you have created your first in a series of teenage vampire novels that trend will have played out and it will be all about orphaned girls and their horses.

Rather than follow trends, Cameron urges artists to follow their heart. If something strikes a cord with you and inspires you to create, then chances are it will resonate with someone else. Best to let your artist child have it’s way, and once it’s quiet, you are free to attend to the necessary adult responsibilities in your life.

The best way, Cameron says, to gain autonomy is to ensure you are physically, mentally and spiritually fit. To this end, good diet, good sleep and good exercise are essential. Personally, I like to keep moderate habits and enjoy walking in the fresh air when I need a break. The repetitive motion of walking allows my mind to rest and is a great form of meditation. Although in the background,  my latest story problem is bubbling away. Often when I return from my sojourn, I find it easier to smooth over that bumpy transition, plug up that plot hole or breathe life into that wooden dialogue.

Combining morning pages with regular physical exercise will keep us “spiritually centred.” In staying true to these practices, along with the artist’s date, we will build our creative core strength and will stay strong in the face of opposition, be it personal or financial, that may impede our creative journey.

For my artist’s date, I sat down and watched the first episode in the series Downtown Abbey, something I have wanted to see for a long time. I thoroughly enjoyed getting lost in the wonderful upstairs/downstairs world of a Edwardian England, where dowager countesses hold court in their drawing rooms and live in blissful ignorance of such unheard-of concepts as “weekends.”

As for the rest of us, we must work, do chores and take care of our families. But somewhere in the mix, we must learn to claim time and energy to nourish our creative selves.

Posted by naomilisashippen in The Artist's Way, 2 comments
The Artist’s Way – Week 10: Recovering a Sense of Self-Protection

The Artist’s Way – Week 10: Recovering a Sense of Self-Protection

Identifying Your Creative Blocks is the First Step in Self-Protection

This week, The Artist’s Way calls for us to name the poison that is holding us back on our creative path. Cameron says that we all have distractions that we use to resist the “God energy” that is trying to flow through us.

The reason why we avoid this “God energy” is because it makes us feel out of control. Creating art is a revelatory process, and sometimes we don’t like what we see and are afraid of what we may find.

Some of the possible blocks we may turn to are junk food, alcohol, drugs, sex or painful love addiction. When our creative going gets rough, it can be easier to let our drug of choice give us an out, succumbing to a food or alcohol binge, busy work or pining for the beloved who will never love us back.

Cameron encourages us to examine our urges and identify those that we turn to when we need a way out. A clue, she says, is the ones we feel most defensive about, the ones we feel that we are entitled to. These are the blocks that are holding us back.

This week, I must admit, I have been neglecting my morning pages. Rather than the usual outpouring of three full pages, I have slowed to a dribble of just a few paragraphs, a sentence or two and on one day, nothing at all.

But how can I do morning pages at a time like this has been my refrain. My husband walked out on our family three weeks ago and I need to find a job, rent an apartment and possibly file for bankruptcy. As a financially abusive alcoholic, he has left me one hell of a mess to clean up, as you can well imagine.

It’s at times like this, that the morning pages seem both frivolous and futile. How can I possibly make time for that when I should be applying for jobs, hiring a lawyer or looking for an apartment to rent? I should be doing something. I should be following the example set by the feisty heroine trope; the one that says we can all be superwomen and superhuman. The one that says we can manage the kids, the house and a soaring career all while dealing with the fallout of a catastrophic marriage collapse and complete financial ruin.

It is during these times of drought, Cameron says, that we need to keep going with the morning pages. We need to show up and press on, even though we don’t feel like it, even though we feel it is a fruitless, empty slog. The drought will come to an end, Cameron says, as long as we keep on going and don’t come to a grinding halt.

For my artist’s date, I gave myself the day off from worrying about my problems to celebrate a win. The short story anthology I have been included in has become available on Amazon. It’s called Life in the Time of Corona and chronicles the many and varied experiences of people during this difficult time.

There are some amazing stories in this collection and I am honoured to be a part of it. It is available in e-book form for under $5, I have left the links below. If you buy the book and enjoy it, I would really appreciate it if you could leave a review. It will be a great help to us writers in these difficult times and getting a bit of praise for our work always makes our day.

On re-reading this chapter and writing this post, my head already feels clearer. Rather than be an impediment to getting on with life, both The Artist’s Way philosophy in conjunction with the morning pages and the artist’s date help you to do what you need to do. A kind of spiritual “taking out the garbage,” they clear the way for better things.

Amazon US: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08BZCFHN9?fbclid=IwAR2Hbrgrkr4bQZEM9oRK7doYs3vBtDi9NhF0mjwDTcFdIsNLlpHsDiQrh5A

Amazon Aus: https://www.amazon.com.au/dp/B08BZCFHN9?fbclid=IwAR1STn0n1bAWr0LBgPZ-xgFdg6uwxA2mPHPHOMh9A1NmwVLwiyVxnAesdrU

Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B08BZCFHN9?fbclid=IwAR1CJBgOZn9Qz5KKULkIX7j8ClDOhj1n4LSJy9a8BOaIr7vXINPlGKAloPk

and Barnes & Noble: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/life-in-the-time-of-corona-aramiha-harwood/1137265753?ean=2940162956235&fbclid=IwAR0ieoJTY3KzBGAH6Cc2Vl6lh_B_RScNzwDmW6559ABmggmlU8Rfk7Zaqvs

The book is also available in the National Library of Australia: https://catalogue.nla.gov.au/Record/8417062?lookfor=life%20in%20the%20time%20of%20corona&offset=1&max=421161

Posted by naomilisashippen in The Artist's Way, 1 comment

The Artist’s Way – Week 10: Recovering a Sense of Self-Protection

Identifying Your Creative Blocks is the First Step in Self-Protection

This week, The Artist’s Way calls for us to name the poison that is holding us back on our creative path. Cameron says that we all have distractions that we use to resist the “God energy” that is trying to flow through us.

The reason why we avoid this “God energy” is because it makes us feel out of control. Creating art is a revelatory process, and sometimes we don’t like what we see and are afraid of what we may find.

Some of the possible blocks we may turn to are junk food, alcohol, drugs, sex or painful love addiction. When our creative going gets rough, it can be easier to let our drug of choice give us an out, succumbing to a food or alcohol binge, busy work or pining for the beloved who will never love us back.

Cameron encourages us to examine our urges and identify those that we turn to when we need a way out. A clue, she says, is the ones we feel most defensive about, the ones we feel that we are entitled to. These are the blocks that are holding us back.

This week, I must admit, I have been neglecting my morning pages. Rather than the usual outpouring of three full pages, I have slowed to a dribble of just a few paragraphs, a sentence or two and on one day, nothing at all.

But how can I do morning pages at a time like this has been my refrain. My husband walked out on our family three weeks ago and I need to find a job, rent an apartment and possibly file for bankruptcy. As a financially abusive alcoholic, he has left me one hell of a mess to clean up, as you can well imagine.

It’s at times like this, that the morning pages seem both frivolous and futile. How can I possibly make time for that when I should be applying for jobs, hiring a lawyer or looking for an apartment to rent? I should be doing something. I should be following the example set by the feisty heroine trope; the one that says we can all be superwomen and superhuman. The one that says we can manage the kids, the house and a soaring career all while dealing with the fallout of a catastrophic marriage collapse and complete financial ruin.

It is during these times of drought, Cameron says, that we need to keep going with the morning pages. We need to show up and press on, even though we don’t feel like it, even though we feel it is a fruitless, empty slog. The drought will come to an end, Cameron says, as long as we keep on going and don’t come to a grinding halt.

For my artist’s date, I gave myself the day off from worrying about my problems to celebrate a win. The short story anthology I have been included in has become available on Amazon. It’s called Life in the Time of Corona and chronicles the many and varied experiences of people during this difficult time.

There are some amazing stories in this collection and I am honoured to be a part of it. It is available in e-book form for under $5, I have left the links below. If you buy the book and enjoy it, I would really appreciate it if you could leave a review. It will be a great help to us writers in these difficult times and getting a bit of praise for our work always makes our day.

On re-reading this chapter and writing this post, my head already feels clearer. Rather than be an impediment to getting on with life, both The Artist’s Way philosophy in conjunction with the morning pages and the artist’s date help you to do what you need to do. A kind of spiritual “taking out the garbage,” they clear the way for better things.

Amazon US: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08BZCFHN9?fbclid=IwAR2Hbrgrkr4bQZEM9oRK7doYs3vBtDi9NhF0mjwDTcFdIsNLlpHsDiQrh5A

Amazon Aus: https://www.amazon.com.au/dp/B08BZCFHN9?fbclid=IwAR1STn0n1bAWr0LBgPZ-xgFdg6uwxA2mPHPHOMh9A1NmwVLwiyVxnAesdrU

Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B08BZCFHN9?fbclid=IwAR1CJBgOZn9Qz5KKULkIX7j8ClDOhj1n4LSJy9a8BOaIr7vXINPlGKAloPk

and Barnes & Noble: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/life-in-the-time-of-corona-aramiha-harwood/1137265753?ean=2940162956235&fbclid=IwAR0ieoJTY3KzBGAH6Cc2Vl6lh_B_RScNzwDmW6559ABmggmlU8Rfk7Zaqvs

The book is also available in the National Library of Australia: https://catalogue.nla.gov.au/Record/8417062?lookfor=life%20in%20the%20time%20of%20corona&offset=1&max=421161

Posted by naomilisashippen in Life in the Time of Corona - Short Story Anthology, 0 comments
The Artist’s Way: Week 9 – Recovering a Sense of Compassion

The Artist’s Way: Week 9 – Recovering a Sense of Compassion

Forgive Your Failures and Move on the Better Things

Artists make mistakes. They hit the wrong note, mix the wrong colours and write dialogue that is flat and lifeless. But rather than use these so-called failures as an excuse to abandon the creative life, Cameron urges us to forgive ourselves, seek solace in the creative community and move on to other projects.

Fear is the undercurrent that runs through the blood of every living artist. Even the most accomplished actors and writers suffer from stage fright and imposter syndrome. This fear often starts in childhood. Parents often discourage their little ones who dream of being dancers, actors or writers. And rightly so. What kind of parent would steer their child towards the risky and often heart-breaking business of being an artist?

Those bat-shit crazy dance moms on reality TV – that’s who.

And so, as artists, we must shake off the fear of parental disappointment. Taking baby steps, we must seek our own tribe to support us in our artistic pursuits. These are the people who will cheer us on when we win and help us back on the horse when we fail. And failure is a given in any artist’s life. It’s just part of the process – not a reason to quit.

For my artist’s date, I settled down with a good book I had not read in quite a while. It’s a book of entertainment vouchers, with discounts to restaurants, spa treatments and holiday destinations. As I leaf through the book, I dream about where I would like to go, what I would like to do and who I would like to take with me.

Posted by naomilisashippen in The Artist's Way, 2 comments

The Artist’s Way: Week 9 – Recovering a Sense of Compassion

Forgive Your Failures and Move on the Better Things

Artists make mistakes. They hit the wrong note, mix the wrong colours and write dialogue that is flat and lifeless. But rather than use these so-called failures as an excuse to abandon the creative life, Cameron urges us to forgive ourselves, seek solace in the creative community and move on to other projects.

Fear is the undercurrent that runs through the blood of every living artist. Even the most accomplished actors and writers suffer from stage fright and imposter syndrome. This fear often starts in childhood. Parents often discourage their little ones who dream of being dancers, actors or writers. And rightly so. What kind of parent would steer their child towards the risky and often heart-breaking business of being an artist?

Those bat-shit crazy dance moms on reality TV – that’s who.

And so, as artists, we must shake off the fear of parental disappointment. Taking baby steps, we must seek our own tribe to support us in our artistic pursuits. These are the people who will cheer us on when we win and help us back on the horse when we fail. And failure is a given in any artist’s life. It’s just part of the process – not a reason to quit.

For my artist’s date, I settled down with a good book I had not read in quite a while. It’s a book of entertainment vouchers, with discounts to restaurants, spa treatments and holiday destinations. As I leaf through the book, I dream about where I would like to go, what I would like to do and who I would like to take with me.

Posted by naomilisashippen in The Artist's Way, 0 comments

The Artist’s Way: Week 8 – Discovering a Sense of Strength

This Week in The Artist’s Way, the Focus is on Turning Lemons into Lemonade.

Being an artist is tough. Whether you’re a writer, painter, dancer or actor, you put yourself on the line every time you share your work, risking humiliation, rejection and sometimes even financial loss. Losses are an inevitable part of being an artist, but rather than denying your shameful artistic failures and hiding them away to yourself, Cameron says that you must acknowledge and work through them so you can move on.

My first novel The Sensory Garden has been out on query for about a month, and apart from a handful of rejections, I have heard nothing back. While my critique partners found a lot of merit in the story, they found my protagonist too passive and the ending unsatisfyingly ambivalent. They had stayed throughout the story with the protagonist they knew and loved, cheered her on through her many battles and tribulations and were waiting for her big payoff at the end. But they didn’t get it. My protagonist settled for compromise and my critique partners were disappointed.

Well, bad luck, I said. Sometimes people are too passive and settle for less than they should. Sometimes we don’t get our happy endings, the villain doesn’t get their comeuppance and the loose ends don’t get tied up in a neat little bow. Real life is full of dead ends, disappointments and compromise and so is my novel. I insisted on telling the story I wanted to tell, and with a shrug of their shoulders, they let me have my way.

But then something happened.

My real-life husband walked out on me and it changed the way I saw my story. My original premise was that everything was all right as long as you have love. My critique partners weren’t buying it and now neither am I.

And so now to the task of editing my novel for the umpteenth time. On legal advice, I will be changing many aspects of the characters I based on real-life people, including my former husband. These artistic and personal losses have been a great wake-up call this week and have alerted me to my own self-delusion and negligence.

I have a lot of work ahead of me to correct both in my writing and in my life.

For my artist’s date, I went to Officeworks and printed off some photos and bought a nice album to put them in. This is something I wanted to do for many years but could never seem to find the time.

It might seem strange for me to be collecting photos that include my former husband, and lovingly curating them into a treasured family album.

But, as I said in the beginning, failures need to be acknowledged, shared and worked through so that you can move onto better things.

Posted by naomilisashippen in The Artist's Way, 10 comments

The Artist’s Way: Week 7 – Recovering a Sense of Connection

Significant Personal Issues Make for a Challenging Week in The Artist’s Way

Sunday, 21st June 2020

As Cameron often points out, art and life are inextricably woven together, with events in our daily lives manifesting in works of art. But on a personal level, the title of this chapter holds great irony for me this week.

I read this chapter last Sunday, when my husband and I were staying in an alpine cabin. We had a relaxing break, driving through the winding mountain roads, dining in the cosy pub and warming ourselves by the log fire he built. Unbeknownst to me at the time, my husband had arranged accommodation in a share house close to the city. And today, one week to the day of our alpine holiday, we sat in our car in the underground carpark of the local Supermarket and he told me our marriage was over.

There was another significant event this week, not of connection, but rather, disconnection. The ultimate disconnection.

My son’s childhood friend passed away, and the funeral was this week. Due to COVID restrictions, I was not able to attend so I watched the live stream broadcast from the funeral home. My son had the honour of being pall bearer and I watched on the screen as he helped wheel his mate into the hearse. He was twenty-four years old.

It is after midnight, but even after several pointless conversations with my husband and ripping through an entire basket of ironing, I am still not ready for sleep. As I settle into bed in the spare room (my husband leaves next week), I tuck into Chapter 8 of The Artist’s Way.

The title of Week 8 is Discovering a Sense of Strength.

I think I’m going to need it.

Posted by naomilisashippen in The Artist's Way, 9 comments

The Artist’s Way: Week 6 – Recovering a Sense of Abundance

Rusti Garden B & B, Cheshunt, Victoria

Rusti Garden B & B, Cheshunt, Victoria

Week 6 Challenges us to Believe That Creativity and Financial Security Can Work Hand in Hand.

I have always seen my writing as something separate from my ability to make an income. It was something that I did after work and on weekends, something that I fitted around the necessity of earning a living.

Sometimes, this “double shift” would catch up with me and I became physically and mentally depleted, sometimes rundown to the point of illness. I worried that my creative life was impinging on my “real life” and that is was affecting my performance at work.

In other words, I saw creativity and money as being at odds with each other. I could not envision that they could actually work in tandem. There are many people who not only make a living, but often achieve great wealth pursuing their creative passion.

But I could not imagine being one of them.

To prosper from one’s creative work was only for a chosen few. These people are an anomaly, the rest of us are destined for drudgery and sacrifice because that’s the way it is.

This week, The Artist’s Way challenges us to believe in abundance, that there is enough in the universe for everyone. In fact, many studies have shown that the earth has plenty of food, water and clean air for everyone on the planet.

It’s distribution that is the problem.

Cameron directs us to “consider the lilies,” who never worry about how to make ends meet. The lilies have faith that God will provide. She tells us that rather than put our faith in money as the bedrock of security, we should put our faith in God. God does not want us to hide our light under a bushel. God wants us to shine. In pursuing our God-given talents, we are honouring Him and in return, He will provide.

Well that’s the theory, anyway.

But doing something we enjoy can sometimes seem frivolous. When I sit down on a Saturday morning to write my novel, my mind often crowds with thoughts of my unwashed floors, unpaid bills and avalanche of laundry. Sometimes, I think that my time would be better spent upgrading some employable skills, like that Business Admin course I let slide.

But Cameron argues that when we think that doing what we want is frivolous we have a toxic relationship with God. God speaks to us through our creativity, and when we ignore the call to paint, write or dance, we are ignoring God’s plan for us and his promise to provide.

Instead, we find solace in martyrdom, in giving up what we want to do for what we think we have to do. But it doesn’t have to be that way. While we must attend to the practical demands of life, we can still make time for creativity. We can dance around the kitchen while we cook dinner, we can do a quick writing sprint at lunchtime, we can dash off a quick sketch on the train into work.

Giving ourselves small treats and breaks creates a sense of abundance. It doesn’t have to be anything big, time consuming or expensive. We can buy a pot plant for our desk at work, spend 15 minutes writing morning pages or take a relaxing bubble bath on the weekend.

For my artists date, I went on a mini break to a rural location. My husband and I planned this trip a while ago, to make up for our overseas holiday that was cancelled due to the COVID crisis. Apart from giving us a break, I had planned this trip to research the location of my next novel.

As the trip grew closer, I had considered cancelling it because I haven’t worked for a while and our savings are running low. When I suggested this to my husband, he said not to worry about it, everything would be alright. He might not be religious, but he certainly puts his faith in the universe.

And so. we went away to a beautiful cabin in the Alpine region of Victoria. As we drove through the winding country roads, I took in the vastness all around me, so different from the cloistered suburb I had been confined to. Undulating, verdant hills. Drifting, pillowy clouds. The smoky, woody smell from the smokestack as we crunched up the gravel driveway. The trilling of the birds breaking the silence of the morning air. The marshy ground underfoot.

All these sights and sounds, all this sensory detail, the irreplaceable experience of simply being there. I would have had none of it had I stayed at home and saved my pennies.

Inspired by my experiences, I sat down at the wooden dining table in our cabin and fleshed out the outline of the novel I’ve been working on. That night, when we dined at a local pub, I told my husband my story idea. I don’t often discuss my story ideas with him, but being relaxed and on holiday, I let my guard down.

I rambled about the plot and subplots, the character arcs and points of view, the inciting incident, setting and the dénouement.

Feeling like a mad-woman, I was glad for social distancing and that the other diners were out of earshot. I don’t usually go on about my stories in public places.

When I finished my story, I sat back and looked at my husband, who had been listening in silence as I spoke. He’s not literary, and I worried that I had said too much, that I had burdened him with something that was of no value or interest to his technically oriented mind.

He looked at me for a moment and I braced myself for what he was about to say. He looked me in the eyes and said.

“Naomi, you’ve just worked out the whole thing.”

And he thought it was a good idea.

I often say that writing a novel makes about as much financial sense as buying a tattslotto ticket, there are no guarantees. But the small amount of time and money I invested on researching the setting of my novel paid dividends in the results it yielded.

So maybe it’s time I changed my negative outlook and opened my mind to what the universe may give me.

Posted by naomilisashippen in The Artist's Way, 3 comments